As Featured In USA Today!

On my 16-year old scooter!

Yours truly was recently part of an article that Matt Krantz over at USA Today put together on people trying to achieve financial independence/retirement at an extremely early age and some of the methods/strategies we use to attain such lofty goals.

It was a great experience and I’m really proud of what I’ve been able to achieve in the last three years.

Please have a look at the article as it’s linked to below. There are some people in this article that are definitely driven and I admire such a wholehearted desire to achieve something that we feel is so worthwhile.

Oh, and Pete over at Mr. Money Mustache was also featured in the article. I think it’s pretty damn awesome to be featured in the same article as the two-fisted, sukka-free ass kicking warlord of financial independence!

Thanks Matt, and thank you to all the readers that have provided me an immense amount of support over the last couple years!

Retire before 40? Some folks say it can be done

Please keep following the journey as we grow our wealth together. You readers inspire me more than I could ever hope to reciprocate.

Thanks for reading.

Photo Credit: USA Today and Chip Litherland

Comments

    • says

      Congratulations DM!

      But USA Today should have been more generous and linked to your website, or at least mention its name. Otherwise, people looking for you would never find Dividend Mantra!

      Good luck in your journey!

      DGI

    • says

      I also think USA didn’t share the better than 4% rule plan that both of you (Mantra and DGI) employ…living off increasing dividends and NOT cutting off tree limbs (selling assets) which bare the fruit that feeds you.

      It sure is excellent that the internet is around, because Merrill Lynch and the other “financial advisors” or educational institutions for that matter don’t teach this superior plan for becoming financially independent.

      Thanks guys for sharing the knowledge!!!

    • says

      In addition, the article failed to mention anything about your investment strategy. There isn’t any mention of the word “dividend” in the whole article. For someone who didn’t know anything about DM and his blog, they would think he is simply crazy. As a result, they would never truly get to his message on his blog. I hope DM also doesn’t get in trouble with his current employer and future employers over the next 5 – 10 years.

    • says

      Pusuit,

      Thanks for stopping by!

      Definitely more people for me to inspire. I was actually mentioned on a radio show up north near where I grew up, which sparked a whole segment on financial responsibility. Good stuff!

      Hope all is well.

      Best wishes!

    • says

      DGI,

      Yeah, I’m a bit disappointed that they didn’t mention the blog, to be honest. I didn’t expressly ask for it to be mentioned. I guess I learned for next time. The traffic on the blog is up quite a bit today, so I guess people figured out my identity/blog somehow.

      I agree with you on the lack of the dividend investing clarity or information, however the article wasn’t really focused on that. Rather, it was a piece on people looking to retire/become FI very early in life and a little back story and strategy on it.

      So far, my employer has been pretty supportive of the whole thing. My plan has only been very casually mentioned before today, but the article put it “in the spotlight” if you will. I don’t know why there would be repercussions, but hey if they fire me I guess I’ll take a 6-month paid vacation! :)

      Thanks for stopping by!

      Best regards.

    • says

      Jason,

      Great point there on the 4% SWR. During my interview I actually talked at length about why I don’t really follow the 4% rule and why my withdrawals will simply be the dividends/passive income the portfolio generates…rather than hacking off the branch I’m sitting on. However, I can see the need for simplification, and the 4% rule encompasses a lot of what people are looking to do. I’ll probably be closer to a starting rate of 3.5% with annual raises in the 6-10% range off the base.

      Take care!

    • says

      MFIJ,

      Thanks! I guess I can start giving out my autograph now?? Haha.

      That’s a great early retirement strategy: selling my (worthless) autograph at a premium! I like it. :)

      Best wishes.

    • says

      w2r,

      Thanks so much!

      Yes, 2013 has really gotten off to a wonderful start for me. I’m really, really blessed. I just hope I can continue my progress at this rate. That would be amazing.

      You’re off to a great start as well. Keep it up!!

      Best regards.

    • says

      DGM,

      Thanks a lot! It’s really cool. I’m going to cut out the article and my girlfriend wants to frame it for me. Sounds cheesy, but it’s the small things in life for me! :)

      Hope everything is going just as well for you.

      Take care.

    • says

      Investing Early,

      Hey, I’m one of you. I couldn’t imagine being a “celebrity” of any kind. I guess I wouldn’t mind being a popular FI guru who inspires people, however. In that case, I’d be okay with being a celebrity. Other than that, no thanks! :)

      Stay in touch!

      Best wishes.

    • says

      AAI,

      Thanks so much. Yeah, it feels really great to be a part of something big like that. I hope the article reached home to some people and provided some major inspiration. In that case, the whole thing was definitely worth it.

      Keep up the great work on your end too. Have fun with that new bad ass ride! :)

      Best wishes.

  1. says

    Congrats DM…i mean JF!
    This quote from you is straight money! (pun intended):
    “The goal is to move from the working class to the investment class. Money can work harder than I ever could.”

    • says

      Dtmheat,

      Haha, yeah thanks! I prefer DM. It just sounds cooler (or maybe I’ve gotten used to it).

      I’m glad you liked that quote. I think that of my entire 30-minute blabfest on investing, freedom and retiring early, that was probably one of the better things I said. I’m glad Matt included it.

      Best wishes!

  2. Retire off dividends says

    Very nice DM! While I’ve had the same goal, you have fortunately started much earlier than me. I’ve had discussions with some family members who don’t believe anyone could really do this, you’re showing people it can be done! One question though – Chris Martenson is a world-renowned expert on identifying dangerous growth patterns in global economies and he, as well as other experts, are predicitng a stock correction/collapse of 60% sometime this year. It’s always possible, but do you have a strategy or are you building a bigger portfolio for if this happens when you retire? Thanks.
    -Retiring off Roth dividends

    • says

      Retiring off Roth dividends,

      I don’t really worry about predictions like that. I only worry about what I can control. I can control my savings rate to a degree and I can control how and when I invest. What happens to the global economy tomorrow is way, way beyond my control and so I don’t worry about it.

      I just focus on saving a large part of my net income and invest in the highest quality companies I can find at attractive long-term prices. If the market were to drop 60% sometime this year I’d have the same amount of money to invest with, but much cheaper shares which which to spend my money on. I’d positively go on a shopping spree.

      I hope that helped. I’m always willing to discuss such topics! :)

      And, I’m with Jason. I’d be simply accumulating wonderful companies at clearance rack prices! Sounds good to me.

      Best regards!

    • says

      wes mantooth,

      So far, so good with work. I’m glad that they’ve been supportive. It’s been odd right from the beginning that a guy who works at a car dealership rolls up on a scooter or bus, but it works.

      Thanks for stopping by!

      Best regards.

  3. says

    Very cool, DM. I saw the link/article on the ERE forums last night and thought, hey, Dividend Mantra is famous!

    Did you have any hesitation with your name being published on a forum so large as the USA Today given the potential explanations required at work? Again, congratulations and I thought the article turned out very fair from such a mainstream publication.

    • says

      Net Worth Snowball,

      Haha! I guess I’m famous for a second. Feels oddly similar to how I felt yesterday.

      But in all seriousness, I’m really proud. Like I said above, I’m going to have the article framed. I just think it’s validation for all the sacrifices I’ve had to make over the last few years. All the hard work is culminating into real progress day after day and it feels really good.

      I didn’t have any issues with my real name being published. I’ve had relative anonymity over the last couple years, but I don’t see much changing with my real name being out there in the world. Bigger and better bloggers are well known for their real names anyway. Of course, many of these people are already financially independent. We’ll see how it goes. :)

      I agree with you on how the article turned out. I think it actually turned out very well coming from a national/mainstream media source. I was pleasantly surprised.

      Hope all is well.

      Take care!

    • says

      I had the same questions about your loss of anonymity and the impacts of that. Are you concerned at all about identity theft, given that you publish a lot of personal information on this blog?

    • says

      The Executioner,

      Sorry I didn’t get back to you sooner. For some reason your comment got lost in the shuffle. My apologies!

      I’m actually not worried about it. There are many people who have much more money than I do and are public figures. Now, if I start publishing my SS# or something else I’d have to get my head checked.

      Is there something you see in particular I should be worried about? Maybe I’m glossing over something.

      Best wishes!

  4. says

    Congrats to this DM! As some says above very, very cool!

    Keep on with the savings, the investments and last but not least the writing! You are truly an inspiration!

    /Swedividend

    • says

      Swedividend,

      Thanks for the kind words!

      I’m glad you enjoy the writing. I’m not a writer by trade, so every day is a learning experience. As I mentioned in a previous article, I often identify myself as a writer and would love to be able to do it with more frequency once I’m financially independent. We’ll see if I’m so lucky.

      Best regards.

    • says

      $25000 dividends,

      I would jump at the opportunity to write a book when it’s all said and done. We’ll see if such a chance presents itself. It’s getting easier and easier to self-publish books, so it might be quite possible to do such a thing!

      Keep up the great work. You’re investing at a very rapid pace! :)

      Best wishes.

    • says

      Integrator,

      Thanks!!

      Yeah, validation is exactly the word I thought of when I read the article. It’s much easier to get validation when you’re spending money on the new car, the big house and the fancy nights out. It’s instant gratification.

      The gratification comes much slower doing things my way, but it lasts muuuuch longer! :)

      Keep up the good work on your end too. I hope you make it to $50k in dividend income! That would be amazing.

      Best wishes.

  5. says

    WOW that’s fantastic Mantra, Congratulations!! :) Before you know it you’ll be having lunch with Mr. Buffett, and Berkshire Hathaway will hire you as an investment advisor for their team. ;)

    Too bad you couldn’t have gotten a link to your website from the article, that would have been gold for you.

    5K to 100K in 3 years is phenomenal! I think 15K to live off of is quite lean, even for a frugalite. But at that point it won’t really matter since you’ll have the money to do with as you please.

    Well done Mantra!!

    Cheers
    The Dividend Ninja

    • says

      Ninja,

      Hey, you’re being extremely modest! I was merely mentioned in a mainstream media article. You actually WRITE for the media! That’s pretty amazing, my friend.

      I’m with you on the disappointment of my blog not being mentioned/linked. Unfortunate. I still think the whole experience was really great, but a mention would have been nice. Oh well.

      Thanks for the support. I made great strides in the last three years, and hope to pick up the pace. My summer lull last year put me a little further behind than I should be, but that’s okay.

      Keep up the great work!

      Best wishes.

  6. Anonymous says

    Congrats on the article. Did you read the brutal reader comments? Just reminds me of many who are financially cynical and ignorant.

    • says

      Anonymous,

      I checked a few of the comments, but my browser kept locking up on me. I think it’s for the best. I find mainstream people seem to be helplessly and happily in the dark. It’s like Plato’s Cave. They prefer to be in chains and staring at the wall – it’s easier that way. That’s unfortunate.

      But, for every 50 people complaining there is likely 1 person that is changing their life. That makes it all worth it for me.

      Take care!

  7. Anonymous says

    You’re a star! Congrats to a fellow Floridian; I hope that even just one person reading that, said to himself….hmmm, I never thought of that! I should do that too! Hope a few light bulbs went off to people reading that.

    • says

      Anonymous,

      I’d definitely like to think that just one person out there really got some value out of the article. I know that I certainly had my own “light bulb” moment a few years ago after going through life blind. I’m free now, and just looking to free others!

      Thanks for stopping by as a fellow Floridian! Great to have no income tax, isn’t it?

      Best wishes!

  8. says

    Nice work! And nice scooter! :) Did Matt just reach out to you?

    I love how you’ve saved $100,000 in three short years. That’s huge!

    The one thing I do wonder though is, once you reach the time to pull the trigger, whether you will really be able to walk away from the paying job. I thought about it for 20 months and had to write a book about engineering your layoff before I decided now was the time! lol.

    Best,

    Sam

    • says

      Sam,

      Thanks for stopping by! Much appreciated. :)

      The $100k mark in three years was really great. Obviously a high savings rate was the primary driver of that success, but the stock market run over the last few years certainly didn’t hurt. I think it’s important to be equally skilled in saving money/being frugal as well as investing the free capital. I find that you see a lot of people who tend to hone in on either saving money or investing. You’ll see people living very cheaply or frugally, but with large amounts of cash in savings accounts or CD’s because they focus so much on saving. Others are focused on investing and trying to squeeze every single extra basis point out of their investments. Because they believe they’re so gifted at investing, they sometimes believe that saving money isn’t really necessary because it can always be made later.

      I decided to maximize everything. I decided to be the most intelligent investor I could and settled rather quickly on the strategy I currently use. I knew that once I started it, it was important to stick with it. Focusing on dividends and quality, while minimizing fees has been key. Equally, I decided to figure out how to live as frugally as possible while still living a happy life. Bridging both of those skills simultaneously is what led me to where I am today and where I’m still going.

      As far as the job goes, I’m not so sure about that. I think it depends on how much enjoyment you derive from your job. For me, I’d like to do something different. I’m not saying I’d like to retire and sit on the couch and watch TV all day, or sit by the beach and just relax…although that does sound nice for at least a couple weeks. Rather, I’d like to focus on whatever it is that I feel is the best way to spend my time at that moment, regardless of pay. I actually think that philanthropy by way of giving away my time is probably what’s next. I’d like to make the world a better place, and I honestly don’t feel like I’m doing that in my current position right now. While a great job with good pay, I will be looking for bigger and better things when the time comes.

      I’d also like to focus on writing. I’d quite enjoy having more time to expand my wings a bit in that regard. Spending more time with family and friends is also important. Cultivating relationships is dear to my heart. There’s just so much life and so little time. I’d like to maximize the latter, which will in turn lead to experiencing more of the former.

      Great discussion, and I do appreciate you stopping by.

      Best wishes!

  9. says

    DM,

    That’s so awesome man! Congrats on becoming a celebrity (and spokesperson) for early FI!

    I’m back from my “sabbatical” and it looks like you just keep on rolling. Congrats on clearing the $100k mark!

    • says

      FI Fighter,

      Great to see you posting again! Always nice to have a kindred spirit doing his thing. :)

      Thanks for the kind words. I’m definitely rolling along, and I’m really thankful that I’ve been able to progress as much as I have. It’s a wonderful feeling to see the plan coming together.

      Keep on posting!

      Best regards.

    • says

      Compounding Income,

      Thanks so much. You’ve been around here since the beginning, so it feels good to see our journeys twist and wind together. Much obliged for that!

      Good things are in store for both of us!

      Take care.

  10. Paige says

    Congratulations DM! You’ve accomplished so much this year already and this looks like it will be huge year for you. I wish they would have included a link to your website in the article so people could get the entire picture of what you are doing and why you are doing it. BTW, I was looking on the CNBC website, and the USA story is on there. I was reading through some of the comments and couldn’t help but shake my head. I wish they would have provided the actual website in your story so people could read what you are actually going to accomplish and how you are going to get there. Thank you for sharing your story with us. Congratulations again!

    • says

      Paige,

      Thanks for pointing out the CNBC reference. I wasn’t aware of that. Really cool stuff!

      Yeah, I’m disappointed the blog wasn’t mentioned. I’ll make sure that if I get another chance like that I’ll try to press the issue a bit. Not just for the exposure, but as you point out it’s important for other people who are interested in the same thing to stop by and see how it’s really being done, rather than the negative comments that you’ll see in the mainstream by all the naysayers.

      Thanks for stopping by. I appreciate it and I hope you stay in touch!

      Best regards.

    • says

      wes mantooth,

      I haven’t really bothered to read any of these comments. The few times I’ve seen someone doing something similar to me get published in the mainstream, the naysayers that come on and offer up the usual excuses – “I pay $700/mo in healthcare”…or “I don’t want to sit on a couch and watch TV all day for the rest of my life” or “But I have 4 kids”. There’s people who make excuses and there’s people who make solutions. I’m the latter. The former do not really concern me.

      I’m with you on everyone loving their jobs but us. I certainly am grateful to have my job, but at the same time the thought of it doing it until I’m an old man is quite depressing. But, that’s just me. I’ve always said that early retirement/financial independence isn’t for everyone, and neither should it be. I’ve never thought that what I’m doing is somehow “right” while people who choose to ignore this way of life is “wrong”. We’re just different. Some people choose to work until they are old and gray. Good for them. That’s simply just not for me. I believe in living and letting be. I only offer inspiration for people who choose to go down the path I’m walking, and if you want to follow me I’d love to have you along for the journey.

      Best wishes!

  11. says

    Awesome DM!

    Well deserved recognition for the inspiration you bring. I am sure the article will inspire quite a few more people who are not familiar with the early FI plan. Very cool!

    cheers,
    AA

    • says

      AA,

      Thanks for the support! Inspiration is what I’m trying to offer here and I’m so glad that people find it and use it.

      I do think the article will inspire people. There are of course the naysayers and haters, but there are also people out there that want to do what I’m doing, and they realize that if I can do it, then they certainly can as well.

      Best regards!

  12. says

    Hey Jason

    Just yesterday I read an old comment by you over at jlcollinsnh.com and checked out your site for the first time, and today you are on CNBC and USA Today. Congratulations

    In your jlcollinsnh.com comment, you mentioned living off your dividend income while traveling in low cost countries like Thailand, Ecuador, and the Philippines. That’s exactly what my wife and I are doing. I would be happy to chat with you about it if you like

    We retired in our 30′s and are roaming the earth. We are currently in Mexico, and headed south. At our current pace it will probably take us a few years to cover all of Latin America

    It’s a small world, we hope to see you out there

    Jeremy

    • says

      Jeremy,

      Hey, thanks for stopping by. Wow! You’re living the dream. You must just be in heaven. Amazing!

      I’d love to chat sometime. You can contact me at dividendmantra@yahoo.com or if you want to offer your email here I’ll be sure to get in touch with you.

      BTW, how did you retire in your 30′s? Something similar to what I’m doing, or is there any insight you could offer?

      Thanks for stopping by. I do love it when people are living interesting lives. It gives all of us inspiration to get to where you are.

      Take care!

    • says

      Hi Jim, my email is gocurrycracker@gmail.com

      How I retired in my 30′s is part of what I write about on my blog, the other part being our full time travel.

      The savings side is quite similar to what you are doing. The last many years we haven’t had a car, using the bus/bike/feet to get around. We lived in a small 1930′s era apartment that was walking distance to everything, and we ate at home more times than not. Food spending is our big vice though, we eat well. I publish all of our spending in great detail, you’ll see what I mean

      I didn’t have a solid investment plan for quite awhile, but I ended up mostly in VTI and then later adding a few dividend stocks to boost yield a bit, e.g. COP, JNJ, RYN. Overall it took about 10 years from the day I decided it was a real goal until the day I retired.

      Would love to chat about it if you like. I’ll send you a mail as well

      Cheers

      Jeremy

    • says

      Jeremy,

      Great job on getting to where you’re at now. I see frugality was at the heart of it. Living without a car, and in a cheap abode, is obviously key to that. Good stuff!

      10 years sounds about right for most of us. Keep up the good work and enjoy your travels. I’ll be stopping by!

      Best wishes.

  13. says

    DM, great job! It is so amazing being mentioned nationally. I think I’ll have to pass the opportunity of being retired by 40 :)
    Well, I try at least by 50 :)

  14. says

    DM,

    Long time reader of your blog. Congratulations on hitting 6 figures. Just wanted to let you know that I heard your name mentioned in reference to the USA Today article on “The Retirement Clinic” radio show in Milwaukee, WI this past Saturday. (The show is broadcast on Saturday’s at noon. http://www.newstalk1130.com/pages/weekendprogramming.html). They talked about the magic of compounding but didn’t touch on dividends, probably because the article failed to address that. Really wish your blog would have been mentioned in the article so people could see your strategy.

    • says

      Scott K,

      Thanks for supporting the blog! Much appreciated.

      Wow. That’s very cool to be mentioned on the radio. I heard that I was also mentioned on a show up near my home town in Michigan, which obviously made me proud. It’s great to have people talking about such an important subject, and I’m glad that I offer some type of inspiration towards a common good.

      I also wished the blog would have been mentioned. I’m currently in talks for another potential media spot, and I plan to be a bit more firm on having my blog mentioned. It’s not really for personal fame or glory, but rather to have the naysayers and interested parties alike a place to come and see what exactly it’s all about.

      Stay in touch.

      Best wishes!

  15. Anonymous says

    Awesome job!

    I read through some of the comments on the article and was absolutely floored at how much negativity/cynicism there was. They seem to be angry over the mere notion of such a possibility. I think it goes a long way to show the difference in mindsets.

    People just don’t understand, it’s not about retiring quickly so you can just sit around all day with your feet up… For me, it’s about having FREEDOM, CHOICES, and CONTROL. Hell, the way I see it, it’s borderline irresponsible to NOT work towards being self sufficient!

    • says

      Anonymous,

      I think that there are a lot of people still “plugged in to the Matrix” if you will, or even better still chained to the wall in Plato’s cave. I’ve found that many people prefer to have it that way and keep it that way. Like I’ve said before, financial independence just isn’t for everyone. That’s fine. I’m not trying to talk anyone into this. Rather, I just try and offer inspiration and a road map/case study that anyone can emulate. You can come here and see how theory is put to the test.

      I’m with you. It’s not about working hard for 10 years so you can then quit your job and watch daytime TV and golf until you die. It’s about freedom and choices. It’s about growing as a person and valuing what you do with your life. It’s about being able to live your life how you really want to live it. I mean you only have one life. Tomorrow is not promised, so I plan on making the most of my todays. As it’s been said before, nobody on their deathbed wishes they would have spent more time in the office.

      Best wishes!

  16. Anonymous says

    DM,

    I saw the Today Show this morning on April 10th and there was a segment on retiring early at 40. Your story was featured and in my opinion the Today Show should have paid to have you fly to New York to talk about your plans. I didn’t agree with the financial analyst who was hired to comment on your story.

    It’s interesting to hear about your plans since I’m 40 years old and my net worth is slightly higher than $400k. I plan to continue working for the next 10 years while saving 60% of my net income (currently $50K per year) and expect to generate at least $40K per year in dividend income. I’m looking forward to having more income in retirement than during my working career. I enjoy taking relatively inexpensive cruises in the Caribbean and my plans are to do more expensive international cruises when I retire.

    Have you considered extending your retirement timeline and saving more so you’ll have a higher income in retirement? I think you have an opportunity which most people don’t have to increase your standard of living in retirement. I’m glad that I found your blog and I look forward to reading your postings.

    Thanks and best wishes to you.

    • says

      Anonymous,

      I also didn’t agree with the financial analyst, but somebody had to play Devil’s Advocate. The whole “he could get hit by a bus” comment completely discredited her, in my opinion. Is that what we’re basing financial advice on now? The astronomically unlikely event of getting hit by a bus? I guess I’d rather focus on the likely – like the effects of living below my means and the effects of compounding.

      I haven’t really considered extending my full-time work schedule. I honestly cannot think of anything that would be worth another 10 years or so of my time. That’s just me being honest. But, obviously you have found something worth your time, and that’s wonderful. It’s all about focusing on what you value and maximizing your chances to enjoy the whatever that may be. I value time, and so I’m focusing on my opportunities to maximize that.

      Thanks so much for stopping by! I’m glad you found the blog through the story and I’m really happy you took time out of your day to comment. Hope you stay in touch!

      Best regards.

  17. says

    DM,

    First, want to say that I’ve been an avid follower of your progress for about 2 years, and thank you for being an inspiration to us all! I am now a full proponent of the DGI strategy and have you to thank…

    That said, I think the anonymous poster above and the video on the Today Show raised some interesting questions. Have you factored in health care costs and inflation in your calculations? Additionally, do you have an overall target on what you want your portfolio to be when you’re 40? Finally, do you have a spreadsheet/excel file that has full projections from both now up until you’re close to 80-90 years old? I don’t want this to come off negatively, but I am skeptical that you’ll have “enough” money at 40 to comfortably cover the cost of living/health costs for the remaining 40-60 years of your live…That said, your lifestyle is different than everyones, and I know you spend far less than the average person, so I’m sure if anyone can do it, you can.

    • says

      DJ F.,

      Thanks for following the journey for the past couple years! Means a lot to me. Inspiring and reaching out to others is why I’m here.

      Health care costs have been factored in. First, the biggest thing you can do to lower health care costs is by living a healthy, low-stress lifestyle. I would argue that by retiring so early in life and removing a big source of stress (full-time work), I’ll actually be decreasing my overall health care costs over the span of my life. Besides, it’s actually a very small minority of people here in the U.S. that spend the vast majority of the health care dollars.

      Second, I plan on getting a HDHP very soon here. I’ve seen a few at about the $50/month mark with a $10k deductible. That would require about $17k or so invested at a 3.5% yield to afford the monthly costs. That’s less than 6 months of work.

      Third, I’ll eventually qualify for Medicare when I’m old enough, just like a more traditional retiree. This is something that appears to be lost on people.

      Fourth, the new Affordable Health Care Act changes things a bit as it somewhat subsidizes lower income Americans. That would actually be me in a few years. So, there’s that as well.

      So, I’ll have to definitely cover all of my health care for about 25 years, but I’ll have assistance just like everyone else for at least part of the rest of my life. I plan on writing about this very soon.

      Hope that clears things up a bit.

      Best wishes!

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